Gym Shark Review – Is it For You


Gym Shark is a weight training program from Craig Ballantyne, who is also the creator of the No-gym method of fat loss. The program comes complete with over forty DVDs, which show you exactly what you need to do in order to burn off pounds. In fact, this is one of the best weight training DVDs on the market, and I recommend it highly for anyone looking to get serious about burning body fat. The program does cost about $47 dollars but considering that you are not likely going to go to the gym very often, and you can save money on any supplements you use, the cost should be negligible. However, I do recommend picking up a gym membership if you are serious about following the program.

One of the most impressive things about Gym Shark is that it uses the concepts of overload and adaptation very well. Basically, the concept is this: you work out just as hard as you can, but your muscles keep growing and so your workout is less effective. You can see this in action during the first half of the program when the weight training seems hard. You are actually putting more stress on your muscles than they are being forced to deal with, and they grow slower than the rest of your body. However, by the end of the program, when you have put in a lot of hard work, your body is used to having these stresses, and it is stronger and more able to handle them.

Gym Shark

A woman taking a selfie

The Gym Shark training DVDs are broken up into three main categories. There is a core section, which mainly consists of strength training and stretching; there is an upper-body section including exercises like the Deadlift And Squat, and a cardio section including workouts like Windmills and Running. Each of these sections gets four full DVDs. While I have seen some people compare the price to the more expensive programs like Mad Fitness and Truth About Fitness, I personally would save those extra dollars for a home gym.

What separates Gym Shark from its competitors is that it is designed for beginners and gradual progression. I have found this to be an excellent way to start a program since you don’t have to worry about injuries right off the bat. You can gradually increase the weights and reps as you get better. Also, you will find it’s very easy to progress from one level to another.

There are a few drawbacks to Gym Shark as well. First, they don’t offer any sort of instruction on how to do cardiovascular workouts. That’s really where I would turn to if I wanted some sort of training to tone my body. Second, they don’t cover nearly the amount of topics that Truth About Fitness and Mad Fitness offer. Finally, they don’t include any kind of workout plan. For someone who has an exercise serious hobby or is looking to seriously bulk up, this might be okay.

A Much Ado

Water next to the rock

On the plus side, I feel like Gym Shark does what it says it will do. They give you an overall fitness goal, which can range from six weeks to a year, and then give you a variety of ways to achieve that. After that, you are free to add more goals and workouts as you get more serious about your goals. The program also comes with a nutrition guide and a shopping list. It also comes with videos, a calendar, and an audio book.

Like most other programs on the market today, Gym Shark works off of the premise that you put into the program what you put in your mouth. This means you should only eat foods that are healthy for you and that you enjoy. This is a great way to cut out pre-packaged foods and other unhealthy meals. Also, you will learn that you don’t necessarily need a lot of protein in order to get the results you want.

Final Words

The downsides to this program, however, are a little bit excessive. First, you could become bored with watching the same videos over again. Second, you may not see results as quickly as you’d like because you’ll be doing the same exercises all the time. Lastly, it does require you to buy the food product, which can become expensive. Luckily, it’s priced reasonably enough that it’s still worth trying, though.

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